Immigration, Race and Ethnicity

Previous Spatial Demography and Migration

Xhulio Uruci

Xhulio Uruci
category
graduate student associates
Department of Economics
UC Santa Barbara
Broom Center Affiliation(s)

Graduate Student Fellow

I am a PhD student in the Department of Economics. Prior to UCSB, I earned my B.S. in Math at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. My research interests include immigration, labor, and demographic inequality. My current work focuses on outcomes of US immigrants in regard to education, health, and economic mobility. Originally from Albania, I grew up in Boston.

Yader Lanuza

Yader Lanuza
category
research associates
Sociology
University of California, Santa Barbara
Assistant Professor

 

 

Yader R. Lanuza is assistant professor of sociology at UC Santa Barbara. His research examines the causes and consequences of social inequality in three domains: education, family and the criminal justice system. He focuses largely, though not exclusively, on the experiences of immigrants and their offspring from Latin America and Asia.

Ingmar Sturm

Ingmar
category
graduate student associates
Department of Political Science
UC Santa Barbara
Graduate Student Fellow

Ingmar is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science at UC Santa Barbara. He researches how international institutions shape the dynamics of domestic and international migration caused by conflict and climate change. He focuses particularly on the role that UN bodies play in changing the calculus of migration decisions such as the capacity of these institutions to affect inter-ethnic trust and provide access to public goods. In a separate research agenda, Ingmar researches the effects of sex-ratio imbalances on the military. Aside from his substantive interest in issues around migration, demography, climate change, and political science, he is interested in survey research and quantitative methods. Prior to starting his Ph.D., he was a Teach First Deutschland fellow teaching math and English. Ingmar holds a B.A. in politics, philosophy, and economics from University College Maastricht and an M.A. in international relations from Jacobs University.

Anna Jaskiewicz

Anna Jaskiewicz
category
graduate student associates
Department of Economics
UC Santa Barbara
Broom Center Affiliation(s)

Graduate Student Fellow

I am a PhD student in the Department of Economics. Prior to coming to Santa Barbara, I completed a BA in Economics at NYU in Shanghai. My research interests include labor, urban, and family economics. I am currently working on a project that investigates the effects of temporary shelter construction on neighborhood outcomes in Los Angeles. 

Elizabeth Ackert

Elizabeth Ackert
category
research associates
Geography
University of California, Santa Barbara
Assistant Professor

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. My research interests include racial/ethnic inequality, immigration, education, health disparities, urban geography, and quantitative methods. My individual and collaborative work examines explanations for why racial/ethnic and immigrant-origin groups are unequally distributed across contexts– including schools, neighborhoods, and immigrant destinations– and evaluates the consequences of this contextual inequality for disparities in outcomes in domains such as education, residential mobility, and health. I am particularly interested in understanding how the attributes of immigrant-receiving contexts, including states, communities, neighborhoods, and schools, influence the educational and health outcomes of children and adolescents of Mexican origin.

Tyler Ferree

Tyler Ferree
category
graduate student associates
Department of Anthropology
UC Santa Barbara
Broom Center Affiliation(s)

Graduate Student Fellow

Tyler Ferree is a graduate student in the archaeology wing of the Anthropology Department. He is interested in the ways that human communities mediate the challenges associated with settlement nucleation and the incorporation of multiple social groups in the context of violence and migration. His current research examines how societies respond to these challenges by shifting sociopolitical organization at several scales. He uses ceramic, lithic, and architectural data to demonstrate that people in the Central Illinois River Valley altered both their quotidian foodways and their politico ritual organization in order to moderate the challenges associated with settlement aggregation during the Late Mississippian (A.D. 1300-1425) period.

Broom Graduate Associate

Chris Miljanich

Chris Miljanich
category
graduate student associates
Department of Political Science
UC Santa Barbara
Broom Center Affiliation(s)

Graduate Student Fellow

Chris is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science. His research focuses on how internal migration and demographic change affect elections, representation, political participation, and public policy. Current projects examine how black outmigration to suburbs impacts minority representation in traditionally white districts at the state and local level, and on how the spatial distribution of minority voters affects electoral outcomes. Additional research explores how humans interact with the natural environment, and Chris is currently a Crossroads Fellow at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management where he is part of a team examining public opinion toward Grizzly Bear reintroduction in California.

Current Fellowships:

Crossroads Fellow, Bren School for Environmental Science and Management. 

Broom Graduate Associate

Antoine Dib

Antoine Dib
category
graduate student associates
Department of Economics
UC Santa Barbara

I am a PhD student in the economics department at UCSB. I graduated from the American University of Beirut with a BA and an MA in economics. My current research interests center around international migration patterns and their effect on labor markets, as well as applied econometrics and the use of natural experiments in research design. A current project I’m working on looks at the impact of policy changes on internal migration patterns in the United-States.

Broom Graduate Associate
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